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Responding to catastrophic disasters: Lessons from the World Trade Center terrorist attacks

David A. McEntire, PhD, Jill Souza, MPA

Abstract


The following article uses the 2001 World Trade Center Terrorist attacks as a case study to illustrate the major challenges presented to responders and emergency management officials. It examines not only the consequences of this disaster but also the immediate and long-term measures to deal with it. The article concludes with suggestions on how to prepare for such events in the future.

Keywords


World Trade Center attack; terrorism; response; emergency management; preparedness lessons

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/jem.2009.0011

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