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Using evaluation theory to augment the homeland security exercise and evaluation program (HSEEP) guidance for evaluating operations-based exercises

Ralph Renger, PhD, MEP, Anneke Jansen, MPH, Erin Peacock, MPH, Adriana Cimetta, MPH, Jessica Surdam, MPH

Abstract


Exercises play a crucial role in better preparing for, responding to, and recovering from an emergency by providing opportunities for responders and officials to practice and assess their collective capabilities. Conducting a thorough evaluation of these exercises is critical to ensuring that the nation continually improves its ability to save lives and property. A major emphasis of the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) is on defining and evaluating capability- based objectives to determine the impact of an exercise. Using the integrated theory of evaluation, it is shown how a cost-effective, quality evaluation of operations- based exercises can be conducted while simultaneously not interfering or adding to the burden of exercise players, controllers, or evaluators. It is hoped that this article will act as a catalyst in moving HSEEP to recognize the potential of other sources of information to assist in conducting a more comprehensive evaluation and amend their guidelines accordingly.

Keywords


evaluating, HSEEP, operations-based, exercises, theory

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5055/jem.2008.0021

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