Risk communication needs in a chemical event

Janice S. Lee, PhD, MHS, Sharon L. Lee, PhD, Scott A. Damon, MAIA, CPH, Robert Geller, MD, Erik R. Janus, MS, Chris Ottoson, CIH, Marilyn J. Scott, CSP, ARM

Abstract


In an effort to define the role of state and local health agencies in a chemical terrorism event and to share knowledge, materials, and resources, representatives from state, local, and federal agencies formed the Interstate Chemical Terrorism (ICT) workgroup in 2002.
Working with the ICT workgroup, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) funded a workshop effort to address the basic elements of risk communication (RC) needs in a chemical event. The primary goal of the workshop was to develop templates for chemical fact sheets destined for the general public and press, medical providers, public health officials, first responders, and impacted workers, as well as a list of core competencies and benchmarks. We summarize workshop discussion and outcomes.


Keywords


risk communication, chemical event, core competencies, benchmarks

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5055/jem.2006.0020

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